Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

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Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  BeautifulEvil on Fri Oct 10, 2008 4:12 am

Lately I've been researching iron and its relation to alchemy. The old alchemists remind us to follow nature, and while this may not be exactly what they were alluding I still believe it's highly relevant. Basically I'll be listing quotes I've gathered over the past week and pasting them below. There will be a certain theme, and hopefully some of you can make sense of my research.


Site: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supernova_nucleosynthesis
A supernova is a massive explosion of a star that occurs under two principal scenarios. The first is that a white dwarf star undergoes a nuclear based explosion after it reaches its Chandrasekhar limit from absorbing mass from a neighboring star (usually a red giant). The second, and more common, cause is when a massive star, usually a red giant, reaches iron in its nuclear fusion (or burning) processes. Iron 56 has the highest binding energies of all of the elements and is the last element that can be produced by nuclear fusion, exothermically. All nuclear fusion reactions from here on are endothermic and so the star loses energy. The star's gravity then pulls its outer layers rapidly inward. The star collapses very quickly, and then explodes.


Site: http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/question.php?number=673
There is a small amount of iron in the Sun, because the Sun was made from a gas cloud which must have been enriched by the iron (and other elements) made in several previous stars and supernova. When the Sun runs out of hydrogen it will start fusing heavier and heavier elements together. Stars heavier than the Sun will continue this process until they make iron. Iron is the last element which when fused releases energy, heavier elements take an input of energy to fuse (but release energy by fission), so once a star has made iron there is no more energy available from nuclear fusion and it will die.
...
Less than 200 years ago this wasn't a question that had even been thought of. Mid 19th century models suggested that maybe the Sun was just a ball of hot (molten) iron, but even simple calculations show that without an internal energy source such a Sun would cool down much too quickly for this to be possible.


Site:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Structure_of_the_Earth
Seismic measurements show that the core is divided into two parts, a solid inner core with a radius of ~1220 km and a liquid outer core extending beyond it to a radius of ~3400 km. The solid inner core was discovered in 1936 by Inge Lehmann and is generally believed to be composed primarily of iron and some nickel.

In early stages of Earth's formation about 4.5 billion (4.5×109) years ago, melting would have caused denser substances to sink toward the center in a process called planetary differentiation (see also the iron catastrophe), while less-dense materials would have migrated to the crust. The core is thus believed to largely be composed of iron (80%), along with nickel and one or more light elements, whereas other dense elements, such as lead and uranium, either are too rare to be significant or tend to bind to lighter elements and thus remain in the crust (see felsic materials). Some have argued that the inner core may be in the form of a single iron crystal.[3][4]

The liquid outer core surrounds the inner core and is believed to be composed of iron mixed with nickel and trace amounts of lighter elements.
...
Recent speculation suggests that the innermost part of the core is enriched in gold, platinum and other iron-loving (siderophile) elements.[5]


Site: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siderophile_element
Au, Co, Fe, Ir, Mn, Mo, Ni, Os, Pd, Pt, Re, Rh, Ru

Siderophile elements are the high-density transition metals that tend to bond with metallic iron in the solid or molten state. Siderophile means "iron loving".

Most siderophile elements have practically no affinity whatsoever for oxygen: indeed oxides of gold are thermodynamically unstable with respect to the elements. They form stronger bonds with carbon or sulfur, but even these are not strong enough to separate out with the chalcophile elements. Thus, siderophile elements are bound through metallic bonds with iron in the dense layer of the Earth's core where pressures may be high enough to keep the iron solid. Manganese and molybdenum do form strong bonds with oxygen but in the free state (as they existed on the primitive earth when free oxygen did not exist) can mix so easily with iron that they do not concentrate in the siliceous crust as do true lithophile elements. However, ores of manganese are found in much the same sites as are those of aluminium and titanium owing to manganese's great reactivity towards oxygen.

Because they are so concentrated in the dense core, siderophile elements are known for their rarity in the Earth's crust. Most of them have always been known as precious metals because of this. Iridium is the rarest element occurring within the Earth's crust, with an abundance by mass of less than one part per billion. Mineable deposits of precious metals usually form as a result of the erosion of ultrabasic rocks, but are not highly concentrated even compared to their crustal abundances, which are typically several orders of magnitude below their solar abundances. However, because they are concentrated in the mantle and core, siderophile elements are believed to be present on earth as a whole in something approaching their solar abundances.


Site:http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/auriferous

Etymology of "auriferous"

From Latin aurum (“‘gold’”) + ferre (“‘to carry’”)


Site:http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ferrous

Etymology of "ferrous"

1. of, or containing iron
2. (chemistry) of compounds of iron in which it has a valence or oxidation number of 2


Site:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron-sulfur_world_theory
The iron-sulfur world theory is a hypothesis for the origin of life advanced by Günter Wächtershäuser, a Munich chemist and patent lawyer, involving forms of iron and sulfur.[1] Wächtershäuser proposes that an early form of metabolism predated genetics. Metabolism here means a cycle of chemical reactions that produce energy in a form that can be harnessed by other processes. The idea is that once a primitive metabolic cycle was established, it began to produce ever more complex compounds. A key idea of the theory is that this early chemistry of life occurred not in bulk solution in the oceans, but on mineral surfaces (e.g. iron pyrites) near deep hydrothermal vents. This was an anaerobic, high-temperature (near 100°C), high-pressure environment. The first 'cells' would have been lipid bubbles on the mineral surfaces. Wächtershäuser has hypothesized a special role for acetic acid, C2H4O2. Acetic acid is part of the citric acid cycle that is fundamental to metabolism in cells.

Some of the fundamental ideas of the iron-sulfur theory can be summarized in the following brief recipe for life: Boil water. Stir in iron sulfide and nickel sulfide. Bubble in carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide gas. Wait for peptides to form.

More technically, Wächtershäuser hypothesized the following steps for producing proteins:

1. Produce acetic acid through metallic ion catalysis.
2. Add carbon to the acetic acid molecule to produce three-carbon pyruvic acid.
3. Add ammonia to form amino acids.
4. Produce peptides and then proteins.


Site:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aries_(astrology)
Aries, the ram, is the first astrological sign in the Zodiac. Originating from the constellation of Aries. In western astrology, this sign is no longer aligned with the constellation as a result of the precession of the equinoxes. In astrology, Aries is considered a "masculine", positive (extrovert) sign. It is also considered a fire sign, and is one of four cardinal signs.[3] Aries is ruled by the planet Mars. Being the first sign in the zodiac, Aries is associated with the astrological 1st house.


Site:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planets_in_astrology#Mars

Mars is the ruling planet of Aries and, for many astrologers, Scorpio. Mars was the Roman god of war and bloodshed, whose symbol was a spear and shield (from which its glyph is derived). Both the soil of Mars and the hemoglobin of our blood are rich in iron, and because of this they share its distinct deep red color.[5] Mars orbits the sun in 687 days, spending about 57.25 days in each sign of the zodiac. It is also the first planet that orbits outside of Earth's orbit making it the first planet that doesn't set along with the sun.


Site:http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Adam

Etymology - "Adam"

From Hebrew אָדָם (adam) "earth", "man", "soil", "light brown" < אדמה (adamah) 'red earth', 'ground'.


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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  BeautifulEvil on Fri Oct 10, 2008 4:37 am

Site:http://vincentbridges.com/category/fulcanelli/page/2/
Fulcanelli speculates that this reason could have been related to the statue’s hermetic symbolism. He reveals the primitive name of St. Christopher, Offerus with its echoes of Orpheus the Gnostic Greek Christ, and then goes on to tell us that this Christopher, he who carries Christ to the masses, is also Chrysopher, the gold bearing one to the hermeticist. And then Fulcanelli adds a few sentences in Green Language code that goes to the heart of the matter.

“From this one can better understand the extreme importance of the symbol of St. Christopher. It is the hieroglyph of the solar sulphur (Jesus), of the nascent gold, raised on the mercurial waters and then carried, by the proper energy of this Mercury, to the degree of power possessed by the Elixir.”

In these lines, we will find by the end of our quest that Fulcanelli has not only explained the secret of the alchemical transformation, but also pointed in very direct language at the true meaning and history of Christianity. The key of course is the meaning and origin of the St. Christopher myth. Fulcanelli will return to this topic later in the book, when we see that the St. Christopher myth is actually part of a much larger, galactic scale in fact, cosmological myth. For now though, Fulcanelli gives us one more spin on the St. Christopher motif.

He draws our attention to an ancient statue at Rocamadour in Brittany, a St. Christopher high on the St. Michel heights guarding an old chest out of which protrudes a broken sword chained to the rock. He tells us that this an example of all the ancient sword in the stone myths, validating our design supposition while expanding the concept to include all sorts of rod and stone motifs, from Moses to Atalanta the Amazon’s javelin. They are all “the same hieroglyph of this hidden matter of the Philosophers, whose nature is indicated by St. Christopher and the result by the iron-bound chest.


Site:http://www.geocities.com/jussaymoe/dc_cathedral/cathedral3.htm

Before he was a Christian Saint, Christopher was called Offerus, whose only desire was to serve the Greatest King on earth. Without going into the whole story, I will point out that at one point Offerus asks a hermit where he could see Christ, and he is told "Everywhere". At any rate, the image of Offerus, a giant who was 'dull in spirit' carrying Christ over the river is a symbol of the gross matter that carries the gold, while the river is Chaos, the opposite of Form. Note the diamond pattern on Offerus' belt below. (Read Fulcanelli beginning on page 148 for more.)


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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  BeautifulEvil on Fri Oct 10, 2008 4:38 am

I believe that's enough for this morning! Cool

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  Salazius on Fri Oct 10, 2008 5:38 am

Hi !

Interesting. Thanks.
I've been meditating a little also on iron.
The way it fixate oxygen in blood, the way it acts as a base for the aura (magnetic sphere) of the Earth. The way water acts on it. How iron live/die...

I have worked a little with it the two last month. I put 2 grams of iron powder in a little of water, the following night I was face to a big grey wolf in a dream (mars, instinct, savage power), each time I add some water or H2O2, I dreamed about a wolf, and my relationship with it change and evolved.
The first times it was free and independent, I ran behind to catch him, and at last, he was in a position of submission on his back. Totally under control.
But, it gave me a lot of dark mood and low energy each time in the day (nigredo). Fortunately, I didn't worked on 100 grams !

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  solomon levi on Sat Oct 11, 2008 5:59 pm

@ Salazius - the wolf is, alchemically speaking, stibnite.
It's relation to iron is spoken of in much alchemical literature.


The definition of "sidereal" is "of or pertaining to the stars".
It's interesting how this relates etymologically to iron - siderite - greek for "loadstone".

Also worth note - "chalybs" - steel.
Chalybes - an ancient tribe credited with the invention of the iron industry.
Also Khalib and Khalid - a prominent character in a certain alchemical work.
Also related etymologically to Excalibur - more sword and the stone, sword piercing serpent - stone serpents...

Also interesting is the quote about iron being the last in a series of sorts in suns,
and stibnite is supposed to be the last in the series of minerals pre-metal, according to some alchemical authors.

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  solomon levi on Sat Oct 11, 2008 6:06 pm

Could the "sidereal distillation" referred to by Philalethes be not the distillation of the stars,
but green language hinting at iron's ability to "carry over" solar sulphur to antimony?
We know that much of his work was on the stellated martial regulus.

Also of note: feral - wild, in an untamed state. Also, 2nd definition: causing death, fatal; funeral, gloomy.
Feral often related to dogs; aka wolf.

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  solomon levi on Sat Oct 11, 2008 6:15 pm

another:

hemo, haima - blood.
hematite - ore of iron.
also in hemo we have behemoth - the beast again (as with feral).
and of course "chemo".

Perhaps instead of hals cheumia (alchemy) we have hals hemo - blood salt or iron salt.

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  BeautifulEvil on Sat Oct 11, 2008 6:22 pm

I like your research solomon levi. I will have to think about this some more before I can make another worthy post. Give me a few hours! Wink

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  solomon levi on Sat Oct 11, 2008 6:26 pm

I'm not sure if this is related, but I've often contemplated carbon as a prima materia since all organic
life is carbon based and Fulcanelli gave the G hint (G and C are the same letter in ancient alphabets,
including cabalistic greek - gamma).

Anyway, carbon turns iron into steel - sider into chalybs.
Carbon is related to 18th century theories of phlogiston.

phlogistos - "burnt up", inflammable.
phlegma - "inflammation, heat, humor caused by heat"
our word pituitary comes from "mucus, phlegm"

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  solomon levi on Sat Oct 11, 2008 7:02 pm

Oh yeah - chalybs and cherubs - greek and hebrew for an order of angels.
L and R are interchangeable.
Cherub is etymologically related to gryphon which Fulcanelli discusses.

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  BeautifulEvil on Sat Oct 11, 2008 7:04 pm

These are just a few meaningful relations I found. I'm going by the base "fer*" and I know this can be mutated a number of ways ("v", "b", "p", "ph"). For example, if we can change "fer" into "vir" and this brings about a whole new set of words. Vir sometimes means "man" or "hero," and it's also the root for "green."


Site: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=fer&searchmode=none
heifer
O.E. heahfore, of unknown origin, not found outside Eng. The first element seems to be heah "high," common in O.E. compounds with a sense of "great in size." The second element may be related to O.E. fearr "bull," or to O.E. faran "to go" (giving the whole a sense of "high-stepper"); but there are serious sense difficulties with both conjectures. In modern use, "a female that has not yet calved," as opposed to a cow, which has calved, and a calf, which is an animal of either sex not more than a year old.

feral
1604, from M.Fr. feral "wild," from L. fera, in phrase fera bestia "wild beast," from ferus "wild" (see fierce).

fere
"companion" (obsolete), from M.E. fere, aphetic of O.E. gefera, from base of faran "to go, travel" (cf. Ger. Gefährte "companion").

ferment
1398, from L. fermentare "to leaven, ferment," from fermentum "substance causing fermentation, leaven," from root of fervere "to boil, seethe" (see brew).

ferocity
1606, from Fr. férocité, from L. ferocitatem (nom. ferocitas) "fierceness," from ferocis, an oblique case of ferox "fierce, wild-looking," a derivative of ferus "wild" (see fierce) + -ox, -ocem (gen. -ocis), a suffix meaning "looking or appearing" (cognate with Gk. ops "eye, sight"). Ferocious is first recorded 1646.

ferret - (don't pay too much attention to this, what I wanted to point out was "furonem and fur")
1398, from O.Fr. fuiret, dim. of fuiron "weasel, ferret," lit. "thief," from L.L. furionem (related to furonem "cat," and also "robber"), probably from L. fur (gen. furis) "thief." The verb (c.1450) refers to the use of half-tame ferrets to kill rats and flush rabbits from burrows; the extended sense of "search out, discover" is 1580.

ferrous
1865, from L. ferreus "made of iron," from ferrum "iron."

ferry (v.)
O.E. ferian "to carry, transport," from P.Gmc. *farjanan, from PIE *por- "going, passage." Related to fare (v.). The n. is c.1425, perhaps earlier and from O.N. ferju- "passage across water," ult. from the same Gmc. root. The modern n. use (1590) is a shortening of ferry boat (c.1440).

fervent
1340, from L. fervens (gen. ferventis) "glowing," prp. of fervere "to boil, glow," from PIE base *bhreu- (see brew). The figurative sense of "impassioned" is first attested c.1400.

fervid
1599, from L. fervidus "glowing, burning, vehement," from fervere "to boil, glow" (see brew). Figurative sense of "impassioned" is from 1656.

fervor
1340, "warmth or glow of feeling," from O.Fr. fervor, from L. fervor "a boiling, violent heat, passion," from fervere "to boil" (see brew).

infernal
c.1374, from O.Fr. infernal, from L.L. infernalis "of the lower regions," from infernus "hell" (Ambrose), lit. "the lower (world)," noun use of L. infernus "lower." For the name of the place, or things which resemble it, the It. form Inferno has been used in Eng. since 1834, from Dante.

interfere
1440, "to strike against," from M.Fr. enterferer "to strike each other," from entre- "between" + ferir "to strike," from L. ferire "to knock, strike," related to L. forare "to bore, pierce," and cognate with O.E. borian "to bore" (cf. punch (v.), which has both the sense "to hit" and "to make a hole in"). Fig. sense of "to meddle with, oppose unrightfully" is from 1632.

Lucifer
O.E. Lucifer "Satan," also "morning star," from L. Lucifer "morning star," lit. "light-bringing," from lux (gen. lucis) + ferre "carry" (see infer). Belief that it was the proper name of Satan began with its used in Bible to translate Gk. Phosphoros, which translates Heb. Helel ben Shahar in Isaiah xiv.12 -- "How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning!" [KJV] The verse was interpreted by Christians as a reference to "Satan," because of the mention of a fall from Heaven, even though it is literally a reference to the King of Babylon (cf. Isaiah xiv.4). Lucifer match "friction match" is from 1831.

offer (v.)
O.E. ofrian, from L. offerre "to present, bestow, bring before" (in L.L. "to present in worship"), from ob "to" + ferre "to bring, to carry" (see infer). Non-religious sense reinforced by O.Fr. offrir "to offer," from L. offerre. The noun is first recorded 1433, from O.Fr. offre (12c.), verbal noun from offrir. The native noun formation is offering (O.E. offrung), verbal noun from offrian.

suffer
c.1225, "to undergo, endure" (pain, death, punishment, judgment, grief), from Anglo-Fr. suffrir, from O.Fr. sufrir, from V.L. *sufferire, variant of L. sufferre "to bear, undergo, endure, carry or put under," from sub "up, under" + ferre "to carry" (see infer). Replaced O.E. þolian, þrowian. Meaning "to tolerate, allow" is recorded from c.1290.

I want to also make one more connection, it's with the word "fire."

fire (n.)
O.E. fyr, from P.Gmc. *fuir (cf. O.Fris. fiur, O.N. fürr, M.Du. vuur, Ger. Feuer), from PIE *perjos, from root *paewr- (cf. Armenian hur "fire, torch," Czech pyr "hot ashes," Gk. pyr, Umbrian pir, Skt. pu, Hittite pahhur "fire"). Current spelling is attested as early as 1200, but did not fully displace M.E. fier (preserved in fiery) until c.1600. PIE apparently had two roots for fire: *paewr- and *egni- (cf. L. ignis). The former was "inanimate," referring to fire as a substance, and the latter was "animate," referring to it as a living force (see water). Fire applied in Eng. to passions, feelings, from c.1340. The v. sense of "sack, dismiss" is first recorded 1885 in Amer.Eng., probably from a play on the two meanings of discharge: "to dismiss from a position," and "to fire a gun," the second sense being from "set fire to gunpowder," attested from 1530. The first use of fireman as "person hired to put out (rather than tend) fires" is 1714. Firecracker is Amer.Eng. coinage for what is in England just cracker, but the U.S. word distinguishes it from the word meaning "biscuit." Firebrand "one who kindles mischief or passions" is from 1382. Firefly is attested from 1658. Fired up "angry" is from 1824. To play with fire "risk disaster" is from 1887; phrase where's the fire? "what's the hurry?" first recorded 1924.

One more, and what I wanted everybody to note is the mutation of the first consonant, "f" into "b" and "p."

... from L.L. birrus "red," from Gk. pyrros "red," lit. "fire-colored,"

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  solomon levi on Sat Oct 11, 2008 8:58 pm

Hmmm

fervent - ferment
suffer - sulphur

Yeah, I had another bull - ox reference pop up when I was searching too.
Let's see if I can find it...

Oh yeah - behemoth = pehemau - "water-ox" with hema as the root - blood-iron.

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  BeautifulEvil on Sat Oct 11, 2008 11:19 pm

I don't know why yet, but I find the word "paris" very suspect!

paris = faris = ferrous

Supposedly the word derives from the tribe name "Parisii" (the original inhabitants of the area). Others also attest to the fact the word "Parisii" derives from the word "parisio." I can accept this as a decent explanation; the "working people" or "the craftsmen."


Site:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paris#Etymology
Other authors consider that the name of the Parisii tribe comes from the Celtic Gallic word parisio meaning "the working people" or "the craftsmen."

------

This is kind of beside the point, and I know it will start to sound strange. Let's take a look at the word "faerie" and "fairy." This sounds very suspect, almost like ferre and ferrous, etc.

Okay, so he's talking about faeries now... Confused


Site:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_in_mythology
Iron, particularly Cold iron, was employed as a protective substance or charm against faeries. In various folklores, Supernatural creatures are held to hold an aversion to iron or even be harmed by the touch of iron. Conversely, amongst Asian traditions, there are tales of ironworking fairy.

-----
Fulcanelli mentions this in The Mysteries of the Cathedrals on page 84:
"This helps us to better understand the words of Pernety: 'The Adepts say they draw their steel from the belly of Aries, and they also call their steel their lodestone.'"
This is in reference to the production of the universal solvent.

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  solomon levi on Sun Oct 12, 2008 12:39 pm

On a tangent, I just noticed that solvent = sun wind.

I was studying more astology last night and came across several more references to "bearing, carrying over".
I really like the one you mentioned - ferry. So blatantly obvious when we look.

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  BeautifulEvil on Sun Oct 12, 2008 6:12 pm

I really like the one you mentioned - ferry. So blatantly obvious when we look.
Yes, I thought that was pretty obvious also. I could be very wrong though - I've been wrong a million times before! Wink


Without going into the whole story, I will point out that at one point Offerus asks a hermit where he could see Christ, and he is told "Everywhere". At any rate, the image of Offerus, a giant who was 'dull in spirit' carrying Christ over the river is a symbol of the gross matter that carries the gold, while the river is Chaos, the opposite of Form.
A giant dull in spirit, could this also mean something else, like "a giant with a small amount of gold" - almost like iron ore or volcanic mineral deposits/ore. Then we have "the gross matter that carries the gold" - is this also another allusion to what we've been discussing?

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  solomon levi on Tue Oct 14, 2008 3:07 pm

some notes on iron from Fulcanelli's "dwelling"

"Iron, on the other hand, has a lot of fixed sulphur of a dark, dull, filthy
and so imperfect red, that in spite of its fire-proof quality, we would not really know what
to do with it." - pg 410

Somewhere else he said the sulphur of iron was red and the mercury blue
and when mixed they give a purple color. I thought that was interesting.
Purple-red in greek is "phoinis" - the phoenix.


I'll edit this so I don't lose it...
I'm flipping through, looking...
here's something interesting:
Marcus Aurelius Antonius.... mars/iron, gold, antimony

"According to Valmont de Bomare, Roman Vitriol, also called vitriol of the adepts,
is not green copperas (ferrous sulphate), but a double vitriolic salt of iron and copper."
-pg 393

on the same page, quoting Basil Valentine - "I say here about this that you must imprint
very clearly this argument in thy spirit and that you entirely bare your thoughts on the metallic
vitriol, and that you remember that I have entrusted this knowledge to you that one can
from mars and venus make a magnificent vitriol in which the three principles can be found
which often serve to the birthing and production of our stone."


pg - 273: Among metallic bodies, the one containing the highest proportion of fire, or latent light, is iron (sideros)....
it is imortant to communicate this active fire to the passive subject: only it has the power to modify its cold and
sterile complexion by rendering it firey and prolific. The sages call it green lion, wild and ferocious lion -
cabalistically leon pher, which is rather suggestive so as to dispense from insisting any further.
note - leon pher is greek phonetic rendering for french lion vert - green lion.

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  BeautifulEvil on Tue Oct 14, 2008 4:57 pm

"Iron, on the other hand, has a lot of fixed sulphur of a dark, dull, filthy and so imperfect red, that in spite of its fire-proof quality, we would not really know what to do with it." - pg 410

"According to Valmont de Bomare, Roman Vitriol, also called vitriol of the adepts,
is not green copperas (ferrous sulphate), but a double vitriolic salt of iron and copper."
-pg 393
I've read that three metals contain red sulphur: iron, copper (when you extract the sulphur from copper, it's not green, but red), and gold (there may be others too, antimony maybe?). It's also interesting to note that copper and gold are really the only metals in which the outward appearance is yellow/orange (tinted the color of the sun). This makes them very important I believe.

This is just speculation of mine, but I believe iron and copper are perfect mates for each other. Please note the alchemical symbol for iron is the common symbol to represent the male, and that of copper represents the female. With this in mind I think we can safely say there will be some significance in their alchemical "marriage.' Perhaps gold is the child of venus and mars? Hmm, maybe we can justify this? We can look for similar traits, and this may lead to something more concrete.

Somewhere else he said the sulphur of iron was red and the mercury blue
and when mixed they give a purple color. I thought that was interesting.
Purple-red in greek is "phoinis" - the phoenix.
Phonics: referring to the relationship between the letters and the letter sounds of a language.
Isn't it kind of interesting how phoninis/phoenix almost sounds like phonics.

Marcus Aurelius Antonius.... mars/iron, gold, antimony
Haha, that never dawned on me. If his name is pure coincidence, then I'll be a monkey's uncle.

pg - 273: Among metallic bodies, the one containing the highest proportion of fire, or latent light, is iron (sideros)....
it is imortant to communicate this active fire to the passive subject: only it has the power to modify its cold and
sterile complexion by rendering it firey and prolific. The sages call it green lion, wild and ferocious lion -
cabalistically leon pher, which is rather suggestive so as to dispense from insisting any further.
note - leon pher is greek phonetic rendering for french lion vert - green lion.
Hmm, this is definitely revealing. Especially the mention of the Green Lion, its relation to iron, and the phonetic cabala. Also, Fulcanelli mentioned iron's sulphur was of an impure nature, but if we can somehow clean it up then we'll have the metal with the most proportion of fire at our disposal. He mentions the "passive subject" - do you know to what he's referring? Is it anything specific?

_________________

Garden of the world near the new city, In the path of the hollow mountains:
It will be seized and plunged into the Tub, Forced to drink waters poisoned by sulfur.
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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  solomon levi on Tue Oct 14, 2008 5:43 pm

I've always thought stibnite. You know, the martial regulus.
Stibnite is the female/patient/mercury and iron is the male/agent/sulphur.
But we've heard arguments on that.
I dismiss them.
There's too much evidence - all the stages Fulcanelli describes:
the star appearing, the net, the color purple, the appearance of the first matter described by Flamel's story...
all these have been accomplished even recently by Principe and Newman and described
in Newton's notes and Starkey's. It's a fact that the regulus can produce a star.
And it can be taken to the net with the addition of copper

The only thing is that Fulcanelli, in the above quote, says the iron sulphur is so impure they don't
know what to do with it. So maybe they use steel.
There's another clue - our chalybs and our magnet/magnesia.

Anyway, so many authors have pointed out that the stibnite requires the sulphur of iron
because it has a great quantity of lunar mercury and is wanting in solar sulphur.

So I'd bet my butt on the martial regulus path. One just has to sort out the specifics.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Net_(substance)
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/newton/alch-guide.html

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  solomon levi on Sun Nov 16, 2008 6:21 am

BeautifulEvil wrote:
Hmm, this is definitely revealing. Especially the mention of the Green Lion, its relation to iron, and the phonetic cabala. Also, Fulcanelli mentioned iron's sulphur was of an impure nature, but if we can somehow clean it up then we'll have the metal with the most proportion of fire at our disposal. He mentions the "passive subject" - do you know to what he's referring? Is it anything specific?

Amongst my notes - Alexandre Von Sutchen:
"The sulphur of antimony is more vegetable than metalline and can be purified with tartar/vegetable fire.
But in the metal work we want to purify it with mars/iron. The antimony draws the soul/sulphur from mars."

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  BeautifulEvil on Thu Dec 11, 2008 8:31 pm

Foris (Latin) = gate; door (or as an adverb it means outside)

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  pierre on Fri Dec 12, 2008 5:55 am

Hi, ¿Can I say something?

BeautifullEvil wrote:
Also, Fulcanelli mentioned iron's sulphur was of an impure nature, but if we can somehow clean it up then we'll have the metal with the most proportion of fire at our disposal. He mentions the "passive subject" - do you know to what he's referring? Is it anything specific?

I share the opinion of Solomon levi. The iron is purified through Antimony as shown BV in its 12 keys. We get this way, an amalgam of metal, whose hallmark is a figure of cross lines with the shape of a star on its surface. This is the philosophical mercuy of Fulcanelli`s dry path.

Solomon levi wrote:
It's a fact that the regulus can produce a star. And it can be taken to the net with the addition of copper
The only thing is that Fulcanelli, in the above quote, says the iron sulphur is so impure they don't know what to do with it.


BV said that if we join the beauty of Venus to the constancy of the moon and the hardness and strength of Mars, by a spiritual way, a person can earn a comfortably living, or something like that...

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  solomon levi on Sun Dec 14, 2008 1:02 am

Yes, the method I am familiar with, but have not done the hands-on, is to make
martial regulus, then venusian-martial, then add the 2 doves of Diana.
Without Diana/silver, the "mercury" will not join with mercury to produce "our mercury" which is
the bath of sol.

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  pierre on Sun Dec 14, 2008 5:11 am

Hi Solomon Levi.

Do you first do the regulus martial, then a regulus martial- venusians and then add the two doves of Diana? ¿Am I corrrect? ¿which substances are the two doves of diana, in your opinion?

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Re: Some Notes on Iron and Alchemy

Post  solomon levi on Mon Dec 15, 2008 12:43 pm

Yes.
Silver - 2 parts to one part martial-venusian regulus.

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